How to Make Guinea Hen Egg Pound Cake

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How to Make Guinea Hen Egg Pound Cake

An egg separator seemed like a useless gadget until I cracked open an egg to use for making guinea hen egg pound cake and tried to separate the yolk from the white. Although it was the end of my hatching season, the guinea hens hadn’t gotten the memo and kept right on laying. Not wanting their eggs to go to waste, and having come by the rare treat of tree-ripened peaches, I decided to use the eggs to make a pound cake to serve with the peaches.

But when I cracked open the first egg, its thick, hard shell shattered, leaving no intact halves with which to separate the yolk from the white. That’s when I remembered an egg separator I had bought decades ago but never used. I dug it out of the bottom of my useless-gadget drawer and it worked perfectly.

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Egg Separators

My egg separator is an attachment for a vintage Busy Liz kitchen funnel. Although Mirro no longer produces the Busy Liz, plenty of used ones are still being offered online.

The Busy Liz attachment works on the same principle as the inexpensive Oxo Good Grips egg separator available in department stores and online.

Instead of placing the egg separator directly over the mixing bowl, I highly recommend placing it over a smaller bowl and separating the eggs one by one. That way, if any of the eggs turn out to be old or addled, you won’t have spoiled the whole batch.

Pound Cake Variations

Once you know how to raise guineas, you’ll find they tend to lay eggs all over the place. So if you don’t happen to have guinea hen eggs everywhere. Or your guinea hens have stopped laying for the season. You can use six eggs from some of your best chickens for laying eggs in place of the nine guinea eggs.

Flavoring is another variation. Depending on what I plan to serve the cake with, I sometimes flavor it with lemon zest (finely grated lemon rind), and sometimes I use almond extract. To serve with fresh fruit, I generally use lemon zest. To serve cake as a stand-alone dessert, I usually use almond extract. Both versions are equally delicious.

This cake may be made either using butter or using vegetable oil, with a barely perceptible difference in flavor. When I’m running low on butter, I use vegetable oil. Another tasty variation is to substitute 6 ounces of cream cheese for the butter.

A final decision is whether to bake one big cake or several smaller loafs. When I’m baking for just my husband and myself, I make small loafs, serve one fresh, and freeze the rest for later. When we’re having company, I bake one large cake and slice it into multiple servings.

guinea-hen-egg

Guinea Egg Pound Cake With Butter

9 guinea eggs
1½ cups sugar, divided
¾ cup butter (or cream cheese)
zest 1 lemon or ½ teaspoon almond extract
½ tablespoon vanilla
3 cups flour
1 tablespoon baking power
1 cup + 2 tablespoons milk

Separate the guinea eggs into two bowls, yolks in one, whites in the other.

Beat the whites until frothy. Add ¾ cup sugar and beat into soft peaks.

Cream together the butter, lemon zest (or almond extract), and vanilla. Beat in ¾ cup sugar and the egg yolks.

Sift together the flour and baking powder. Add to the yolk mixture alternately with the milk. Gently fold in the egg whites.

Turn the batter into a buttered 2-quart baking mold and bake at 350°F for 55 minutes. Or turn into six small buttered loaf pans and bake at 350°F for 35 minutes. The cake is done when a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.

Guinea Egg Pound Cake Without Butter

9 guinea eggs
1½ cups sugar, divided
2/3 cup vegetable oil
zest 1 lemon or ½ teaspoon almond extract
½ tablespoon vanilla
½ teaspoon salt
3 cups flour
1 tablespoon baking power
1 cup + 2 tablespoons milk

Separate the guinea eggs into two mixing bowls, yolks in one, whites in the other.

Beat the whites until frothy. Add ¾ cup sugar and beat into soft peaks.

Cream the egg yolks with ¾ cup sugar. Add oil, flavorings, and salt.

Sift together the flour and baking powder. Add to the yolk mixture alternately with the milk. Gently fold in the egg whites.

Turn the batter into a buttered 2-quart baking mold and bake at 350°F for 55 minutes. Or turn into six small buttered loaf pans and bake at 350°F for 35 minutes. The cake is done when a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.

Brew a cup of tea and enjoy your guinea egg pound cake, with or without fresh peaches and whipped cream.

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